Lucie Deacon | Contributing Writer | Tuesday, 31 January 2017

Confronting ludicrous body terminology

These Amazing Images Confront Our Ridiculous Body Image Standards

The Debrief: Emma Fay Challenges Body Image Through New Exhibition 'Ridiculous'

Camel toe, bingo wings and muffin top are all terms we hear thrown around every day. But when you literally visualise these terms, they seem absurd, not to mention downright derogatory. So why have they become normalised?

This is exactly what concept artist Emma Fay’s new exhibition ‘Ridiculous’ seeks to challenge.  She confronts us with the absurdity of phrases such as trout pout and six pack through by literally representing them on the human body.

 

Emma said ‘the series is a comment on how the human body is portrayed in society today. It draws on the somewhat senseless terminology that media culture has introduced into our everyday conversations.’

She explains that, "Body shaming has become commonplace in society through advertising, social media and the press; quite disturbingly, this has also filtered down to our everyday conversations and has increasingly become an influential cause of mental health issues. I worry that the body is now commonly portrayed in a superficial manner that is both unrealistic and unattainable. Through focussing on flaws, we seem to have forgotten how to celebrate the body.’

She said, "The portrayal of the body in today's media culture is a subject matter that I am keen to raise awareness of, and I hope the series encourages more educated conversations about the way in which we appreciate our forms.”

The (FREE) exhibition runs from Saturday 28th January to Sunday 5th February at the Attenborough Arts Centre in Leicester. For more details please visit their website. 

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Tags: Artists, Body worries